Failure for Success in Women’s Leadership

Long ago, I received some leadership advice from a good friend that has continued to resonate within both my work and personal life for years: Take chances. When you fail, admit your failures and learn from them. The fear of failing can be paralyzing, and leaders must do more than fail at random or simply learn from their mistakes. Being a true leader requires having the confidence to trust yourself and take risks, for it is only through taking risks – and often failing at them – that you can innovate and improve, explore new ideas, and pursue excellence for yourself and your team.

Failures give us the opportunity to reset, learn and grow, and a leader understands that it is crucial to take advantage of these opportunities. Your reaction, response and recovery from failure can be an incredibly powerful path to success. When you let go of the fear of failure and instead seek active learning, adopt various perspectives, embrace continuous improvement, pay it forward and – most importantly – never give up, it will allow you to lead teams through a journey of discovery, innovation and success.

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U.S. Women More Likely to Have Multiple Jobs

Even though a majority of American workers are single jobholders, more workers are steadily holding more than one job in order to have another source of income,  gain more experience and explore multiple interests. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Multiple Jobholders in the United States: 2013 report, which looks at characteristics of workers by sex, industry, occupation and work schedule, about 13 million workers have two or more jobs.

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Senator Kamala Harris Proposes Equal Pay Certification for Large Companies

Women who work full time are paid about 80 cents for every dollar a man makes, which adds up to over $400,000 in missed wages over a woman’s career. For minority women, the loss is about $1 million in missed wages, according to the National Women’s Law Center.

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DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies for Diversity

DiversityInc just announced their annual list of the Top 50 Companies for Diversity for 2019. Over 1,800 companies participated in a survey to evaluate the performance of their diversity-management initiatives in the context of their own industries. The four key areas under evaluation were talent pipeline, talent development, leadership accountability and supplier diversity. See below for the companies that outperformed the competition in diversity.

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Companies with the Best Outlook in 2019

Comparably, a platform that provides comprehensive data on work culture for companies across the United States, just released their Best Company Outlook Awards 2019. The annual awards highlight companies with the best outlook, who are ranked by employee ratings regarding how they feel about the company’s future and whether they would recommend the company to a friend.

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Life of a Female Veteran: U.S. Army Combat Veteran Erica Courtney (Part 4 of 6)

With my EMBA close to completion, I was offered a senior level job at a logistics company in Miami. They needed me to lead and grow the government market. Even though I kicked and screamed about being pigeon-holed in logistics and contracting, it sure was a marketable skill. I used to buy everything, from BBQs and sunglasses to furniture and aircraft armor. I worked with the contracting officers and comptrollers who handle the big budgets routinely when I had to equip my units in the U.S. or abroad. Now companies wanted to know how to get to the person I used to be.

It was obvious people had no clue how to deal with federal buyers. I could build a section and plan out their approach. Sure, sign me up. I will take the job. For the first time, I had to think about what I was going to wear. It had been uniforms day in and day out forever. Not a big shopper, I found outfits on mannequins that looked good and showed up early, because if you are not early in the Army you are late. 

No one was there when I got there. The boss pulled up, happy to see me and said I was looking sharp. I thought nothing of it. I had to be very guarded; you never give off signals in the Army. My boundaries were disciplined. In Miami, flirtatiousness abounded. I wanted to be taken seriously and flirting would have destroyed that. I worked hard and the boss loved me, but I was in my own bubble. No one knew what I was doing or had any idea about government. I was not connecting with the workers. It was not a good fit. 

I left after a year. Corporate America was not my thing. However, during this time, Oprah and The White House Project named me, along with 50 other women around the country, a woman with the background and drive to change the world. We were all sponsored and flown to New York to collaborate with community, government and private leaders who inspired me to continue to serve. 

Degree in hand, I decided to go it alone. My family was now moving to Jacksonville, Florida. The need for government business development was there. I researched the market and found many unqualified people charging a fortune to break into this space. People just don’t know what they don’t know. You can’t just jump in. You have to understand the buyer’s language. I knew within 30 seconds if I would work with a vendor or not while serving. Why not prepare people correctly, especially if they were willing to pay for my expertise?
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Current Impact of the Government Shutdown: How Have You Been Affected?

Today marks the 17th day of the partial government shutdown that started on December 22nd, 2018, which is now the third longest government shutdown in U.S. history. Many, but not all, government agencies have been affected, causing federal employees to either be furloughed or to work without pay, national parks to close and affordable housing funding to come to a halt, among other effects.

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SB 826 Women On Boards Passes. What Happens Next?

SB 826, known as the women on boards bill, narrowly cleared the California State Assembly with the minimum amount of votes required and then went on to clear the state Senate. The measure requiring corporate boards to include at least one woman by the end of 2019 and depending on the size of the company, up to three by the end of 2021 now sits on Governor Jerry Brown’s desk waiting to be approved or vetoed. Continue reading

Women Graduates Earn More at These Three Universities

Closing the gender pay gap is a battle with many fronts. One of those fronts, a recent study discovered, is at top U.S. universities. The study, conducted by BusinessStudent.com, a website for prospective business students, did not take into account cost of living by area, or field of study. Instead, it simply focused on graduates of 117 leading universities based on the U.S. News & World Report College Rankings for 2018 and data from the U.S. Department of Education.

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